How to be a Hybrid Training

The Go Primal Hybrid Training: Forever Getting Stronger and Sexier!

Are you tired of monotonous workout routines that fail to deliver results? Say goodbye to fitness plateaus and hello to hybrid training – a dynamic approach that combines the best elements of strength, conditioning, and functional movement. In this SEO-optimized blog post, we'll explore the myriad benefits of hybrid training and its main structure, centered around key pillars including push, pull, hinge, squats, rotational strength, heavy carries, and conditioning. Discover why hybrid training is the perfect fitness solution for individuals of all ages, particularly those aged 30 and above.

The Benefits of Hybrid Training:

  1. Comprehensive Strength Development:

    • By incorporating a variety of movements such as pushing, pulling, squatting, and deadlifting, hybrid training promotes balanced muscle development throughout the body.
    • Engaging multiple muscle groups simultaneously leads to functional strength gains that translate into improved performance in daily activities and reduced risk of injury.
  2. Enhanced Cardiovascular Fitness:

    • Hybrid training seamlessly integrates conditioning exercises like sprints, jump rope, and battle ropes alongside strength work, providing a cardiovascular challenge that boosts heart health and endurance.
    • Interval training, a common component of hybrid workouts, has been shown to increase metabolism, burn calories, and improve overall fitness levels.
  3. Increased Functional Mobility:

    • Rotational strength exercises and movements that mimic real-life activities enhance functional mobility and flexibility.
    • Improved mobility translates into better posture, increased range of motion, and reduced stiffness, particularly beneficial for individuals in their 30s and beyond who may experience age-related declines in flexibility.
  4. Versatility and Adaptability:

    • Hybrid training can be tailored to suit individual fitness goals, whether it's fat loss, muscle gain, athletic performance, or overall health and wellness.
    • With endless exercise variations and modifications, hybrid training keeps workouts fresh and exciting, preventing boredom and promoting long-term adherence to fitness routines.

The Main Structure of Hybrid Training:

  • Push: Exercises such as bench press, shoulder press, and push-ups target the muscles involved in pushing movements, including the chest, shoulders, and triceps.
  • Pull: Pull-ups, rows, and lat pulldowns strengthen the muscles responsible for pulling actions, such as the back, biceps, and rear delts.
  • Hinge (Deadlift): Deadlift variations, Romanian deadlifts, and kettlebell swings develop posterior chain strength, including the hamstrings, glutes, and lower back.
  • Squats: Back squats, front squats, and single-leg squats target the quadriceps, glutes, and core, improving lower body strength and stability.
  • Rotational Strength: Russian twists, woodchoppers, and medicine ball throws enhance rotational power and core stability, crucial for functional movement patterns.
  • Carry Heavy Stuff: Farmer's walks, suitcase carries, and overhead carries challenge grip strength, core stability, and total body strength.
  • Conditioning: Interval sprints, jump rope, and battle ropes improve cardiovascular fitness and metabolic conditioning, ensuring a well-rounded training experience.

Hybrid Training: Perfect for Individuals 30 and Above

  • As we age, maintaining muscle mass, bone density, and functional mobility becomes increasingly important for overall health and quality of life.
  • Hybrid training addresses these needs by combining strength, cardiovascular, and mobility exercises in a balanced and effective manner.
  • With its versatility and scalability, hybrid training is suitable for individuals of all fitness levels and ages, offering a safe and efficient way to achieve fitness goals and age gracefully.

Check out our free weekly Hybrid Training Session

Hybrid training represents the future of fitness, offering a holistic approach that addresses strength, conditioning, mobility, and functionality in a single workout. By incorporating the key pillars of push, pull, hinge, squats, rotational strength, heavy carries, and conditioning, hybrid training delivers unparalleled results for individuals of all ages, particularly those aged 30 and above. Whether you're a seasoned athlete or a fitness novice, embrace the power of hybrid training and unlock your true fitness potential today!

A week of Hybrid Training with Go Primal coaches

Day 1: Push & Pull Focus

  1. Push:

    • Barbell Bench Press: 4 sets x 8 reps (75% of 1RM)
    • Dumbbell Shoulder Press: 3 sets x 10 reps (moderate weight)
    • Push-Ups: 3 sets x max reps
  2. Pull:

    • Pull-Ups: 4 sets x 6-8 reps (bodyweight or weighted)
    • Bent-Over Rows: 3 sets x 10 reps (moderate weight)
    • Face Pulls: 3 sets x 12 reps

Short Conditioning Workout:

  • 10-minute AMRAP (As Many Rounds As Possible) of:
    • 10 Burpees
    • 15 Kettlebell Swings
    • 20 Mountain Climbers
    • Rest 1 minute between rounds

Rest: 60-90 seconds between sets, 2-3 minutes between exercises

 

Day 2: Hinge Focus

  1. Hinge (Deadlift):
    • Deadlift: 4 sets x 5 reps (80% of 1RM)
    • Romanian Deadlift: 3 sets x 8 reps (moderate weight)
    • Kettlebell Swings: 3 sets x 15 reps

Short Conditioning Workout:

  • Tabata: 20 seconds work, 10 seconds rest, alternating between:
    • Jump Squats
    • Jump Lunges
    • Burpees
    • Box Jumps

Rest: 60-90 seconds between sets, 2-3 minutes between exercises.

Day 3: Squat Focus

  1. Squat:
    • Back Squat: 4 sets x 6 reps (75% of 1RM)
    • Goblet Squats: 3 sets x 10 reps (moderate weight)
    • Bulgarian Split Squats: 3 sets x 12 reps each leg
    • Walking Lunges: 3 sets x 20 steps

Short Conditioning Workout:

  • 5 rounds for time:
    • 400-meter run
    • 20 Box Jumps
    • 15 Push-Ups

Leg Accessory Work:

  • Leg Press: 3 sets x 12 reps
  • Leg Curl: 3 sets x 12 reps
  • Calf Raises: 3 sets x 15 reps

If your gym don't have machines, you can use bands to do banded squats, GHD rise or Nordic rise in GHD.

Rest: 60-90 seconds between sets, 2-3 minutes between exercises.

 

Day 4: Rotational Strength & Heavy Carries

  1. Rotational Strength:

    • Russian Twists: 3 sets x 20 reps (weighted)
    • Woodchopper: 3 sets x 12 reps each side (moderate weight)
    • Medicine Ball Throws: 3 sets x 10 reps each side
  2. Heavy Carries:

    • Farmer's Walk: 4 sets x 50 meters (heavy weight)
    • Suitcase Carry: 3 sets x 40 meters each side (moderate weight)
    • Overhead Carry: 3 sets x 30 meters (moderate weight)

Short Conditioning Workout:

  • EMOM (Every Minute on the Minute) for 10 minutes:
    • 10 Kettlebell Swings
    • 10 Push-Ups

Rest: 60-90 seconds between sets, 2-3 minutes between exercises.

 

Day 5: Full Body Strength

  1. Compound Movements:

    • Clean and Press: 4 sets x 6 reps (moderate weight)
    • Pull-Ups: 3 sets x max reps
    • Deadlift: 4 sets x 5 reps (80% of 1RM)
    • Barbell Squats: 4 sets x 6 reps (75% of 1RM)
  2. Accessory Work:

    • Bulgarian Split Squats: 3 sets x 10 reps each leg
    • Bent-Over Rows: 3 sets x 10 reps
    • Dumbbell Shoulder Press: 3 sets x 10 reps

Short Conditioning Workout:

  • 3 rounds for time:
    • 400-meter Row
    • 20 Box Jumps over
    • 15 Push-Ups

Rest: 60-90 seconds between sets, 2-3 minutes between exercises.

Day 6: Active Recovery

  • Yoga or mobility work: 60 minutes focusing on stretching and flexibility.
  • Zone 2 cardio 30-60 minutes of rucking, biking, rowing or even running if you feel strong. Try to minimize impact.

Day 7: Rest Day

  • Rest and recovery: Focus on relaxation and allowing your body to recover from the week's training.